Saturday, February 11, 2017

Upgrading Paint On Ancient Valdor Tank Hunter














I've had one of my earliest Forgeworld purchases sitting in my display cabinet awaiting a bath of Simple Green for years now. Needless to say, my painting has changed a lot over the last decade. I don't know when this tank was purchased, but it was so old that it had developed a thick coating of dust. Rather than get my hands all goopy paint stripping the thing, I decided instead to practice some weathering on it. So, in order to upgrade the tired paint scheme, I added enamel pin washes, a light brown filter, streaking, weathering powders, and a new headlight lens.

So, yes it works. Weathering can save a vehicle from the dreaded orange smelling green solvent bath. I might even add some stowage and push the vehicle further along. On the other hand, I have a FW Thunderhawk to build.

16 comments:

  1. That is quite a transformation. It is fantastic how much some weathering can do to model. Love your work with realistic models, hope to see more 40 work.

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    1. More 40k/30k is on the way. I have several big things to paint. It has been a matter of getting my painting area cleaned off enough for some extended painting.

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  2. Chipping and enamels really add so much dimension to a model. It's amazing the effect! That should be a new slogan. Don't simple green it, weather it!

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    1. That slogan works, though the lack of panel shading on the model does hold it back. I'm really happy nonetheless. I have a game in mind for this guy.

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  3. Pretty badass transformation. Ahem... THUNDERHAWK! THUNDERHAWK! THUNDERHAWK! No pressure.

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  4. It wasn't bad to start with, but yeah, great improvements through the medium of weathering. Nice work.

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  5. Could you explain what you use as a filter?

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    1. Good question. Usually I use a thinned down enamel paint. When I do this, I have to have a protectant on the model in order for the enamel thinner to not damage the paint job. The goal is to keep the filter on the panels, and out of the recesses. In this instance the surface was unsuitable for enamel due to a bad lacquer. So I used a 10:1 diluted Buff color from Tamiya. That smoothed out the color variation and toned down things. Then I used a another filter of brown earth on the lower portions. That simulated dirt and dust, but also accomplishes the same thing.

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    2. Thank you for taking the time to answer

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    3. It was a great question. I ignored filters for years, but had to start using them after getting involved with painting tricolor camoflague.

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    4. I've been trying to research these as like you I'm wanting to refresh my tanks. Problem I have is finding something suitable for dark blue & black camo scheme I used for my traitor guard.

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    5. I would try a navy blue filter. So long as it was significantly diluted I think it would work to soften the camouflage edges.

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  6. Looks very well there. Truly using the ancient part of its name.

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  7. Great weathering work. But for me it looked good even without the weathering.

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    1. I appreciate that. It was pretty uneven when viewed up close though. Weirdly, the decals had started pulling off of the model. This was long before I had started using micro-set to affix them. The trick now is finding a good place in my cabinet. I think it deserves a better position than the lowest rung now!

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